REDEFINING THE BELLY BUSINESS

As business owner, dancer, teacher and choreographer at Ethereal Tribal, Fryett juggles her many roles with the sway of a performance. The company, established recently in Montreal, has grown steadily and boasts appearances at the McGill Theater, La Compagnie de Medievale, Tribalement Votre, Theatre St. Denis, and St. Basile Le Grand.

Ethereal Tribal is a professional dance group and incorporates many styles of dance. It represents a fusion of cultures, ages and life approaches, allowing room for change and redefinition. The possibilities with this form of belly dancing are infinite as it adapts while growing.

Andrea Fryett is well-respected among the dancing community and has had the pleasure of working with famous dancers like Ansuya, Zoe Jakes, Kami Liddle, Moria Chapel, and Bozenka. In August, she performed with Sharon Kihara and Mardi Love from the superstars as well as Ariella Aflalo. But the thing that makes Fryett light up when she speaks is the most recent addition to her repertoire of unique collaborators: a male belly dancer!

Tribal Fusion’s audience often turns loyal, attending most of the shows. Recently, one male spectator caught their attention by the enthusiasm he displayed at every one of their performances— and he was picked out of the crowd and asked to dance with them! Fryett says that they needed a black male dancer for the part and he, with his vibrant energy, was exactly what they were looking for. His moves
are not feminine, says Fryett, even though belly dancing is thought to be a sport of women. Rather, men take the basic belly dancing moves and redefine them; they lend to them male energy and strength. Whether male or female, this redefined kind of belly dancing might be just the thing for you.



—Maggie Pagratis
Article first published in BusinessNewsmakers Magazine